delhi-police-sub-inspector-exam-paper-2009

दिल्ली पुलिस – उपनिरीक्षक (Sub Inspector) एग्जाम पेपर – 2009

Directions (Q.No. 181 to 185): A number of sentences are given below which, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Each sentence is labeled with a Roman number. Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the four given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.
181. I. The result was all the more astonishing when it was discovered that the person doing the praying didn’t have to know the patient personally, or even know their names.
II. Seriously ill patients in hospitals were divided into groups, some being prayed
for, while others were not.
III. A striking example that there is a reachable place beyond material reality is prayer.
IV. In all cases, best medical care was still given, yet it became evident that the
prayed-for group seemed to recover better.
V. Beginning more than twenty years ago, researchers devised experiment to try to
verify whether prayer had any efficacy.
A. V, III, II, I, IV
B. III, V, II, IV, I
C. V, I, IV, III, II
D. III, II, V, V, I

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Answer -B

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182. I. God has managed the amazing feat of being worshipped and invisible at the same time.
II. Millions of people might describe him as a white bearded father figure sitting on a throne in the sky, but none could claim to be any eyewitness.
III. Although it doesn’t seem possible to offer a single fact about the Almighty that would hold up in a court of law, somehow the vast majority of people believe in God—as many as 96 per cent, according to some polls.
IV. This reveals a huge gap between belief and what we call everyday reality.
V. We need to heal this gap.
A. III, I, II, IV, V
B. II, III, IV, V, I
C. I, II, IV, V, III
D. I, II, III, IV, V

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Answer -D

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183. I. At first you think of it as just a matter of growing bigger.
II. There is nothing in the world more fascinating than watching a child grow
and develop
III. Then, as the infant begins to do things, you may think of it as ‘learning tricks’. IV. In some way, the development of each child retraces the whole history of the human race, physically and spiritually, step by step.
V. But, it’s really more complicated and full 2 of meaning than that.
A. II, I, III, V, IV
B. IV, I, II, III, V
C. I, III, II, IV, V
D. IV, I, III, II, V

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Answer -A

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184. I. It has removed many of the material obstacles to the pursuit of the good life from the majority of mankind in those countries at a high level of technical development.
II. But it has exposed us to new dangers, not the obvious dangers of new weapons of destruction, but the much more serious ones of a purely materialist view of life.
III. The growth of science and technology has conferred obvious and immense
benefits upon the community.
IV. It has also, as we too often forget, made possible new and daring adventures of
the mind.
A. III, I, IV, II
B. I, II, IV, III
C. I, III, II, IV
D. III, IV, II, I

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Answer -A

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185. I. A person is neither the product of just his environment nor just his genetic make up.
II. Let me give an example.
III. A child is born with a talent for music, which gets nurtured through continuous
training in a conducive atmosphere.
IV. The transactional model of child development helps to resolve the split
between nature and nurture.
V. Rather it is the complex interaction between the two that is key.
A. II, III, IV, I, V
B. IV, I, V, II, III
C. I, IV, II, III, V
D. I, IV, V, II, III

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Answer -C

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Directions (Q.No. 186 to 190) : Fill in the blanks from the four alternatives given.
Many a years ago, we made a (186) with destiny, and now the time comes when we shall (187) our pledge, not wholly or in ful (188) but very substantially. At the  (189) of midnight hour, when the world sleeps, India will (190) to life and freedom.

186. A. engagement
B. pledge
C. promise
D. tryst

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Answer -D

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187. A. recall
B. redeem
C. review
D. revive

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Answer -B

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188. A. length
B. volume
C. measure
D. scope

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Answer -C

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189. A. moment.
B. time
C. point
D. stroke

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Answer -A

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190. A awake
B. come
C. change
D. rally

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Answer -A

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Directions (Q.No. 191 to 200): Read the following passage and answer the questions which follow.
Rubashov found that by no stretch of his imagination could he picture his neighbour’s state of mind, in spite of all his practice in the art of ‘thinking through others’ minds’. He could do it without much effort as far as Ivanov was concerned, or No. 1, or even the officer with the monocle; but with Rip Van Winkle he failed. He looked at him sideways; the old man had just turned his head towards him; he was smiling; holding the blanket round his shoulders with both hands, he was walking beside him with his short steps, humming almost inaudibly the tune of Arise, ye wretched of the earth’.
When they had been conducted back into the building, at his cell-door, the old man turned round once again and nodded to Rubashov; his eyes blinked with a suddenly changed expression, terrified and hopeless; Rubashov thought he was going to call out to him, but the warder had already slammed the door of 406. When Rubashov was shut into his cell, he went at once to the wall; but Rip Van Winkle was
silent and gave no answer to his tapping.
No. 402, on the other hand, who had looked at them from his window, wanted to be told everything about the walk, down to the smallest detail. Rubashov had to inform him how the air had smelled, whether it had been cold or just cool, whether he had met any other prisoners in the corridor, and whether he had, after all, been able to exchange a few words with Rip Van Winkle. Rubashov patiently answered every question; compared with No. 402, who was never allowed out, he felt a privileged person; he was sorry for him and had almost a feeling of guilt.
The next day and the day after, Rubashov was fetched for his walk at the same hour after breakfast. Rip Van Winkle was always his companion in the roundabout. They circled slowly side by side. Each with a blanket over his shoulders, both in silence; Rubashov sunk in thought, from time to time glancing attentively through his pince-nez at the other prisoners or at the windows of the building; the old man, with the growing stubble of beard and his gentle, childlike smile, humming his eternal song.
Up to their third walk together they had not exchanged a word, although Rubashov saw that the officials did not seriously try to enforce the rule of silence, and that the other pairs in the circle talked incessantly; they did so looking stiffly ahead and speaking with the prison technique familiar to Rubashov, hardly moving their lips.
The third day, Rubashov had brought his notebook and pencil with him; note-book stuck out of his left outside pocket. After ten minutes the old man noticed it; his eyes lit up. He glanced covertly at the warders in the centre of the circle, who were holding an animated conversation and did not seem interes in the prisoners; then he rapidly pulled pencil an note-book out of Rubashov’s pocket and began scribble something, under cover of his bell-lila blanket. He finished it quickly, tore off the page. pressed it into Rubashov’s hand; he retained however, book and pencil and went on scribbling Rubashov made certain their guards were paying attention to them, and looked at the page. Nothing was written on it, it was a drawing; a geographical sketch of the country they were in, drawn with astonishing accuracy. It showed the principal towns. mountains and rivers, and had a flag planted in the middle, bearing the symbol of the Revolution.
191. The words ‘almost inaudibly’ here mean that the tune:
A. is hummed quite musically
B. is slightly out of tune
C. is nearly in time with the steps
D. can hardly be heard

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Answer -D

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192. The expression by no stretch of his imagination’ implies that:
A. it was easy to imagine
B. it was hard to imagine
C. it was only by his thinking very hard
D. it was impossible to imagine

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Answer -D

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193. Rubashov left his note-book sticking out of his pocket because:
A. He had forgotten it was there
B. He wanted to record his thoughts
C. He wanted to write a note to Rip Van Winkle
D. He hoped Rip Van Winkle would write in it

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Answer -D

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194. The term ‘conducted’ implies that the prisoners:
A. went on singing all the time
B. went together to cells
C. were guarded on their way
D. went by some kind of transport

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Answer -B

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195. The phrase “he glanced covertly’ here means:
A. He looked with envy
B. He looked through his fingers
C. He looked boldly
D. He looked secretly

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Answer -D

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196. Rubashov felt ‘a privileged person’ because:
A. he was an important prisoner
B. he could pass on information
C. he was allowed out
D. he was patient

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Answer -B

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197. The art of ‘thinking through others’ minds’ means that Rubashov:
A. could influence other people’s thoughts
B. tried to see things as others did
C. could see beyond the thoughts of others
D. tried to see through the plans of others

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Answer -B

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198. ‘Pince-nez’ are spectacles which:
A. have two kinds of lens
B. are kept in place with thick and tight ear pieces
C. have thick lenses
D. are kept in place supported only at the nose

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Answer -D

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199. The prisoners looked stiffly ahead because:
A. the guards would not allow them to turn
B. they were bound tightly
C. they wished to hide that they were talking
D. they did not trust each other

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Answer -C

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200. A growing beard is referred to as stubble because:
A. it is compared with a cut cornfield
B. it is compared with cut tree-stumps
C. it is tough and stubborn to cut
D. it appears dirty and untidy

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Answer -C

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