दिल्ली पुलिस - उपनिरीक्षक (Sub Inspector) एग्जाम - 2008

दिल्ली पुलिस – उपनिरीक्षक भर्ती परीक्षा-2008

Directions (Q. Nos. 181-185): In each of the questions below. the sentences of a paragraph are jumbled up marked as 1, 2, 3 and 4. Find out the order in which the sentences are to be arranged to from a logically coherent paragraph. Mark the number of that choice as your answer.
181. 1. The land of Peshwas has been bestowed with new titles such as the Oxford of the East, the Silicon Valley, the Tech City etc.
2. Gone are the days when Pune used to be known as the Pensioner’s paradise.
3. Everywhere one seems to look nowadays; every space, square foot and inch seems to be occupied by Realtors or another, IT space, residential or corporate structure.
4. It seems to be raining money these days as the investors, the builders and everyone in the corporate sector at large are exploiting all of Pune’s resources and
potential to the maximum.
A. 3 2 1 4
B. 2 1 3 4
C. 3 4 2 1
D. 2 3 4 1

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Answer -D

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182. 1. Though at one time elephants were plentiful in India, incessant poaching and shrinking forests have now made the animal an endangered species.
2. In 1972, the Government made it illegal to kill elephants and also banned the export of ivory.
3. Today there are about 21,000 elephants left in the country.
4. Since then India’s 7000 and odd ivory craftsmen have been supplied imported African ivory and only finished goods can be exported.
A. 2 4 1 3
B. 1 2 4 3
C. 1 3 2 4
D. 2 4 3 1

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Answer -B

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183. 1. The untold misery and suffering of the people who lost their possessions in a matter of few hours is heart rending.
2. The government is geared up to mitigate the suffering of the cyclone victims.
3. However the relief work taken up by the government has to be supplemented by people.
4. The recent cyclone left a traumatic trail of disaster and destruction in the entire
coastal belt of Andhra Pradesh.
A. 4 2 3 1
B. 4 1 2 3
C. 1 4 2 3
D. 1 2 3 4

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Answer -B

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184. 1. The first major declaration was issued by Britain and U.S.A. in 1941. It stated that Britain and U.S.A. would not seek any territory.
2. During the war, the major allied nations issued declarations stating the principle
which would form the bases of peace.
3. It also supported the right of every people to have the form of government of their choice.
4. Early in 1942 was issued the United Nations Declaration. This declaration supported the one issued by Britain and U.S.A. earlier.
A. 1 2 3 4
B. 1 3 2 4
C. 2 4 3 1
D. 2 1 3 4

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Answer -D

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185. 1. Until very recently in human history, the rise and fall of population was essentially a local matter.
2. Throughout history and since dawn of the human species itself, populations have enjoyed both the right to increase and the right of mobility.
3. The steady increase in population provided the essential motor without which the creation of a single human space would not have occurred.
4. Both of these features of human behaviour have played a huge role in shaping
history.
A. 3 1 2 4
B. 1 4 2 3
C. 2 4 3 1
D. 3 4 2 1

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Answer -C

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Directions (Q. Nos. 186-190): Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Our theory and practice in the area of sentencing have undergone a gradual but dramatic meta-morphosis through the years. Primitive man believed that a crime created an imbalance which could be rectified only by punishing the wrongdoer. Thus sentencing was initially vengeance-oriented. Gradually, emphasis began to be placed on the deterrent value of a sentence upon future wrong doing.
Though deterrence is still an important consideration, increased emphasis on the possibility of reforming the offender-of returning him to the community a useful citizen_basis the harsh penalties once imposed and brings into play a new set of sentencing criteria. Today, each offerder is viewed as a unique individual and the sentencing judge seeks to know why he has committed the crime and what are the chances of a repetition of the offence. The judge’s prime objective is not to punish but to treat.
This emphasis on treatment of the individual has created a host of new problems. In seeking to arrive ‘at the best treatment for individual prisoners, judges must weigh an imposing array of factors. I believe that the primary aim of every sentence is the prevention of future crime. Little can be done to correct past damage and a sentence will achieve its objective to the extent that if upholds general respect for the law, discourages those tempted to commit similar crimes, and leads to the rehabilitation of the offender, so that he will not run afoul of the law again. Where the offender is so hardened that rehabilitation is plainly impossible the sentence may be designed to segregate the offender from society so that he will be unable to do any future harm. The balancing of these interacting and often mutually antagonistic factors requires more than a good heart and a sense of fair play on the judge’s part although these are certainly prerequisites. It requires the judge to know as much as he can about the prisoner before him. He should know the probable effects of sentences upon those who might commit similar crimes and how the prisoner is likely to react to imprisonment of probation. Because evaluation of these various factors may differ from judge to judge the same offense will be treated differently by different judges.
The task of improving our sentencing techniques is so important to the nation’s moral health that it deserves far more careful attention than it now receives from the bar and the general public. Some of those at the bar and many civic individuals
who usually lead even the judges in the fight for legal reform approach this subject with apathy or with erroneous preconceptions. For example, I have observed the sentiment shared by many that after a judge has sentenced several hundred defendants the whole process becomes one of callous routine I have heard this feeling expressed even by attorneys who should know better.

186. The author’s purpose in this passage is to:
A. inform readers about sentencing practices in the past
B. convince judges about sentencing practices in the past
C. tell people not to commit crimes for which they might receive unfair sentences D. persuade readers that it is important to improve sentencing techniques

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Answer -D

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187. The word ‘metamorphosis’ in the first sentence means:
A restoration
B. interpretation
C. change
D. fault

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Answer -C

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188. Which of the following situations would be comparable to the ancient idea of sentencing?
A. a lion stalking and killing a dear
B. a child slapping a playmate who has slapped him or her
C. a traffic policeman putting a ticket on a wrongly parked car
D. a person scolding his pet that has tried to run away

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Answer -B

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189. With which of the following statements the author would NOT agree?
A. a judge should treat each offender as an individual
B. a judge should refrain from imposing harsh penalties
C. a judge should try to correct past damages
D. a judge has to be a student of human nature

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Answer -A

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190. According to the passage, what is NOT the objective of the sentencing in modern times?
A. preventing future crime
B. avenging the victim
C. rehabilitating the offender
D. discouraging others from committing crimes

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Answer -B

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Directions (Q. Nos. 191-195): Fill in the blanks with most appropriate word or words.
191. Hurt by the students’ ……………, the teacher……… them and warned them to mend their ways.
A. graciousness – abused
B. misbehaviour – apprised
C. impudence – applauded
D. insolence – scolded

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Answer -B

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192. Her ………….. academic credentials and her …………… and ambitious attitude made her an ideal candidate for the job.
A. moderate – zealous
B. fair – lively
C. impeccable – dynamic
D. mediocre – enthusiastic

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Answer -C

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193. State hospitality extended to visiting foreign dignitaries is often used symbolically to convey …………… messages, and very often pomp and ceremony serve to …………. sharp differences.
A. subtle – mask
B. sharp – hide
C. loud – camouflage
D. important – accentuate

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Answer -A

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194. The ………….. availability of fresh water gives to us the impression that this resource is ……….
A. bountiful – abundant
B. immense – significant
C. frugal – infinite
D. abundant – inexhaustible

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Answer -D

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195. Although he began his life in ………. surroundings, he made it big at a very young age through …………… determination.
A. squalid – Obsessive
B. humble – incredible
C. opulent – admirable
D. modest – significant

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Answer -B

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Directions (Q. Nos. 196-200): Each of the given sentences has four underlined parts. One of them has a mistake. Mark the number of the incorrect part as your answer.
196. We must (A)/ supplement our diet (B)/ with vitamins and minerals in order to keep (C)/ oneself fit. (D)

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Answer -D

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197. Had I been (A)/ in your place. I will have made good (B)/ use of (C)/ such a rare (D)/ opportunity.

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Answer -B

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198. His conservative parents (A)/ did not approve for his marriage (B)/ with a girl (C)/ of his choice. (D)

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Answer -B

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199. Despite being (A)/ paralysed with polio, (B)/ Wilma Rudolph became the fastest woman on earth (C)/ at 1960 Olympics. (D)

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Answer -C

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200. Rapid advances (A)/ in the science of genetics and their applications (B)/ pose new and complex (C) ethical and policy issues to individuals and society. (D)

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Answer -B

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